How to speak wedding

Our Wedding Planner & Stylist Alanah translates some common wedding terms that may have left you saying "huh?".

bride and groom walk down the beach holding hands.

The world of wedding planning can often feel very foreign to many couples. Chances are you havent been too deeply involved in planning a wedding until you start planning your own and when you begin your planning journey it’s surprising just how much “wedding stuff” is out there that you had never considered or realised you required! 

The wedding world has its own list of customs, traditions and in some ways its very own language. Throughout my career as a wedding planner I have had countless couples shyly ask “what does that mean?”. The industry people of the wedding world can easily forget that couples are often first time visitors and throw around terms that might leave you saying “huh?” but never fear! Because I have a handy cheat sheet on how to speak wedding to share with you!

Bump In & Bump Out - This basically means Set Up and Pack Down. Your venue will likely give you Bump In and Bump Out times to pass along to your vendors. 

Pax - Pax usually follows your guest numbers on your runsheet and means guests/people eg 120pax is 120 guests.

Golden Hour - This is a term that Photographers use to describe the time just before the sun sets when the light is magic for photography. 

Beverage Package / Bar Tab / Beverages on Consumption - If you are confused by all the different options for beverages you are not alone, this question is very common!
A Beverage Package is generally a set list of beverages chosen by the venue and is paid for per head for unlimited service over a set period of time. A Bar Tab and Beverages on Consumption are very similar in that the couple sets a limit on the total spend on the bar and drinks are costed individually as served. 

Processional & Recessional - The processional traditionally refers to the Brides entry into the ceremony or her walking down the aisle. The recessional is when the couple walks out of following the ceremony. 

Boutonniere - These are the little flowers that the Groom and Groomsmen have pinned to their jackets and are often called Buttonholes.

Bonbonerie - This is a traditional name for wedding favours. 

Hopefully this leaves you a little more confident to head out and start talking with the wedding world locals but if you do get stumped and need advice or a translator you can always chat with me on the Two Lovers site!


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